12 Step Program of AA


The 12 step program of AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) is a self-help program for alcoholics. The alcoholics anonymous 12 steps is an outline for recovery. By following the alcoholics anonymous 12 steps, the alcoholic can free himself from alcohol addiction. It should be noted that the 12 step program of AA is not necessarily the only treatment recommended for alcoholics; it is often recommended in conjunction with other forms of treatment.





About the Steps

The 12 steps of AA begin with admitting you are powerless over alcohol and that your life has become unmanageable. Until you accept the reality of your problem, you cannot begin the process of recovery.

The alcoholics anonymous 12 steps progress through taking a moral inventory of yourself, making a list of people you have harmed by your drinking, and making amends to them. This can be very difficult to do. The 12 step program of AA is not an easy program to follow or complete.

Later in the Alcoholics Anonymous program, you are to seek to improve your relationship with God, as you understand Him. The “as you understand Him” part is very important. AA has a strong spiritual component, but it is a non-denominational program.

Finally, the alcoholics anonymous 12 steps program says that you should carry the message to others. This is generally done through participation in the program and is also often done by serving as a sponsor, or mentor, to those newer to the program.

Everyone in the Alcoholics Anonymous program is encouraged to get a sponsor. To get a sponsor, you simply ask someone who has been in the program longer than you have to sponsor you. Your sponsor should be someone who has completed all 12 steps. The sponsor supports and encourages you as you work the steps.

Members are encouraged to continue attending after they have completed the steps. The ongoing support of the group will help prevent relapse, and the support of more established members is invaluable to newer members of the group. Members are recognized for the amount of time they have been sober with coins commemorating landmarks such as one month, six months, and one year.

About the Program

The 12 step program of AA is free to alcoholics. Donations are accepted to cover the cost of literature and other costs. Meetings are held in churches and other public buildings that donate space for that purpose.

The alcoholics anonymous 12 steps program is run by alcoholics for alcoholics. It is never run by professionals. It is called Alcoholics Anonymous because group members are supposed to remain anonymous. They know each other by first name only. They are not supposed to share any information about group members outside of the group.

While Alcoholics Anonymous is not the only self-help group available for alcoholics, it is the best known and most widely available. A number of other self-help groups are based on the 12 steps of AA, such as Narcotics Anonymous (for drug addicts), Overeaters Anonymous (for compulsive overeaters), and Gamblers Anonymous (for compulsive gamblers). There is also a self-help group for family members of alcoholics called Al-Anon.

As mentioned at the beginning of this article, the 12 step program of AA is often recommended in conjunction with other forms of treatment for alcoholism. If you have a drinking problem, you should be assessed by a professional to determine the level of treatment that is right for you. You may require more intensive treatment than simply a self-help group. While Alcoholics Anonymous can be a great benefit to you, you may require additional treatment as well.





Related Information

The AA 12 Steps - List of the 12 steps in alcoholism recovery, as well as information about AA and how it works.

Follow this link for more information on the 12 Steps of AA. Find out how the meetings work, and why completing the 12 steps of alcoholics anonymous is not as easy as they may seem. Also included is how to find a local alcoholics anonomous meeting near you. 


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